Cognitive Web Accessibility Assessment: Results for Alzheimer's Foundation of America

These are detailed results of a cognitive Web accessibility assessment. There are 10 possible points, one for each criterion. To be judged accessible, a Web site must meet at least 75% of applicable guidelines for each of the (3) content criteria and the (4) design criteria based upon WebAIM's latest Cognitive Web Accessibility Checklist. Up to 3 points for design-related criteria add to the total score.

Content (2 of 3 Points):

  • Modality Criterion

    • Guidelines Met: None.
    • Guidelines Unmet:
      • Provide content in multiple mediums.
      • Use contextually-relevant images to enhance content.
      • Pair icons or graphics with text to provide contextual cues and help with content comprehension.
  • Focus and Structure Criterion

    • Guidelines Met:
      • Use white space and visual design elements to focus user attention.
      • Avoid distractions.
      • Use stylistic differences to highlight important content, but do so conservatively.
      • Use white space for separation.
      • Avoid background sounds.
    • Guidelines Unmet:
      • Organize content into well-defined groups or chunks, using headings, lists, and other visual mechanisms.
  • Readability and Language Criterion

    • Guidelines Met:
      • Use language that is as simple as is appropriate for the content.
      • Avoid tangential, extraneous, or non-relevant information.
      • Use correct grammar and spelling.
      • Be careful with colloquialisms, non-literal text, and jargon.
      • Be succinct.
      • Ensure text readability.
    • Guidelines Unmet:
      • Maintain a reading level that is adequate for the audience.
      • Expand abbreviations and acronyms.

Design (1 of 4 Points):

  • Consistency Criterion

    • Guidelines Met: None.
    • Guidelines Unmet:
      • Ensure that navigation is consistent throughout a site.
      • Similar interface elements and similar interactions should produce predictably similar results.
  • Transformability Criterion

    • Guidelines Met:
      • Support increased text sizes.
      • Ensure images are readable and comprehensible when enlarged.
      • Ensure color alone is not used to convey content.
    • Guidelines Unmet:
      • Support the disabling of images and/or styles.
  • Orientation and Error Prevention/Recovery Criterion

    • Guidelines Met:
      • Give users control over time sensitive content changes.
      • Provide instructions for unfamiliar or complex interfaces.
      • Provide adequately-sized clickable targets and ensure functional elements appear clickable.
      • Use underline for links only.
      • Provide multiple methods for finding content.
    • Guidelines Unmet:
      • Provide adequate instructions and cues for forms.
      • Give users clear and accessible form error messages and provide mechanisms for resolving form errors and resubmitting the form.
      • Give feedback on a user's actions.
      • Use breadcrumbs, indicators, or cues to indicate location or progress.
  • Assistive Technology Compatibility Criterion

    • Guidelines Met: None.
    • Guidelines Unmet:
      • Appropriate alternative text.
      • Form labels.
      • Logical heading structure.
      • Links make sense out of context (avoid "click here", etc.).
      • A logical, intuitive reading and navigation order.
      • Full keyboard accessibility.
      • Descriptive and informative page titles.

Design-Related (0 of 3 Points):

  • General Web Site Accessibility Criteria

    • Criteria Met: None.
    • Criteria Unmet:
      • Attempts to meet W3C accessibility standards.
      • Has an accessibility statement.
      • Explains how to use site accessibility feature(s).

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